Tag Archives: Zeiss Ikon

bunch of Klapp

Toronto. In English, we say a camera is a folder if it has a bellows that can be folded so the body and lens are more compact – like Kodak folders. In German, the term is klapp, not folder. The … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on bunch of Klapp

a Johnny come lately

Toronto. Introduced in 1924, the Leica by Leitz was a flat out success. Two years later, in 1926, its competitor, Zeiss formed the Zeiss-Ikon group to rationalize the German photographic Industry. By 1932, the first Zeiss Contax reached market – … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on a Johnny come lately

shining Leitz on the human condition

Toronto. Before photography, we relied on paintings and sketches, like those of Hogarth in 18th century London, to depict the human condition. Later in the 19th century when photography found its legs, some enterprising photographers, like Mathew Brady  (American civil … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on shining Leitz on the human condition

a modest merger

Toronto. In 1729, an anonymous article called, “A Modest Proposal” was written by Jonathan Swift, known for his satirical tales like, “Gulliver’s Travels“. The article was also intended to be a satirical piece but was taken as very serious when … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , | Comments Off on a modest merger

hi-yo kinamo

Toronto. In April, 1923 this ad appeared in the American Cinematographer. ICA in Germany announced its 35mm (standard film) Kinamo camera – the smallest movie camera of the time. The Kinamo was designed for both professionals and (advanced) amateurs, hence … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on hi-yo kinamo

introducing a photographer to minicams in 1938

Toronto. When Leitz announced the Leica mid 1920s, most photographers used larger cameras and rarely needed to enlarge their negatives. In 1926, the German government arranged for Zeiss to form the mighty Zeiss-Ikon conglomerate in Dresden to rationalize the German … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on introducing a photographer to minicams in 1938

doing it better (sometimes)

Toronto. On page 31 of the March 1950 edition of Popular Photography, an advertisement touts the Zeiss-Ikon Contax-S camera at whopping price of $475USD with the coated Zeiss Biotar lens. The model S was briefly sold while later models were … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on doing it better (sometimes)

eye of the storm

Toronto. It was ‘the best of times and the worst of times‘ between the world wars. After the first war, pent-up demand blossomed into unprecedented wealth in the first decade, followed by the worst depression ever in the next (world … Continue reading

Posted in history | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on eye of the storm

way too much, way too late

Toronto. The Contarex was Zeiss-Ikon’s SLR flagship. With some 1,100 plus precision measured components, it was an engineer’s dream – and a repairman’s nightmare. The $500 US  “Bulls-eye” Contarex was announced at the 1958 Photokina but didn’t hit the shelves … Continue reading

Posted in camera | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on way too much, way too late

das Nettar das ist gut

Toronto. Ahhh, “the Nettar – that is good”, as they say in Europe. Your collection should have at least one German folder. The Nettar, as it was known, was also called the BOB in Germany. It was a less expensive … Continue reading

Posted in camera | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on das Nettar das ist gut