Tag Archives: Leitz

down to the life size

Toronto. Most 35mm film cameras limited close up subjects to a metre. The Leica M series with a Summicron could focus down to 20 inches. Most cameras used extension tubes or auxiliary lenses to capture subjects closer than a metre. … Continue reading

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brave new camera

Toronto. In the 1920s after losing the great war (WW1), Germany suffered a massive bout of inflation and depression. The Ernst Leitz optical house in Wetzlar had mainly made microscopes, objectives, eye pieces, accessories, and the occasional other optical item … Continue reading

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shining Leitz on the human condition

Toronto. Before photography, we relied on paintings and sketches, like those of Hogarth in 18th century London, to depict the human condition. Later in the 19th century when photography found its legs, some enterprising photographers, like Mathew Brady  (American civil … Continue reading

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book covers

Toronto. There is a saying – you can’t tell a book by its cover. In the early days of miniature cameras, it was the same for model type. For example through-out the screw mount era, Leitz cameras were all ‘Leicas’. … Continue reading

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fit for a Queen …

Toronto. We were all sorry to learn of the death of Queen Elizabeth II recently. Television offered numerous programs about the Queen, her history, and her state funeral. In one program we learned of her favourite past times. I found … Continue reading

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bellows, bellows, everywhere

Toronto. A bellows is synonymous with film photography. For decades, a bellows was one means used to adjust the focal distance between lens and sensitive media so the camera could accommodate any subject distance from say a metre or two … Continue reading

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a heck of a lens

Toronto. The 5cm, f/2.5 Hektor was the first ‘fast’ lens produced by Leitz for the Leica. The mount was much like its stable-mate. the 5cm, f/3.5 Elmar. About 10,000 were made, most before 1938. Production records show the beginning year … Continue reading

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did you hear? the fat’s in the auction!

Toronto. The 9cm Elmar was made from 1931 to 1968 – nearly 40 years. It was an early addition to the Leica stable once interchangeable lenses were marketed. The 9cm focal length had a pleasant presentation of head and bust … Continue reading

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as good as a nod

Toronto. So called detective cameras became popular once the speed of dry plate technology allowed hand held use in day light. The camera itself was built into or enclosed by various satchels, leather boxes, purses, etc. At our December, 2003 … Continue reading

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a view from above

Toronto. When the novel Leica camera took off in the 1930s, Leitz created a plethora of accessories to allow the tiny marvel to be used for almost every photographic task. Years earlier, folders and box cameras used a viewfinder where … Continue reading

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