Tag Archives: Leica

transitions

Toronto. After recovering from WW2, Leitz embarked on their famous M series bayonet mount cameras with the extremely popular M3 camera. Like many leading manufacturers, Leitz was aware of their strong base of owners of the older screw mount cameras. They … Continue reading

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a heck of a lens

Toronto. The 5cm, f/2.5 Hektor was the first ‘fast’ lens produced by Leitz for the Leica. The mount was much like its stable-mate. the 5cm, f/3.5 Elmar. About 10,000 were made, most before 1938. Production records show the beginning year … Continue reading

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did you hear? the fat’s in the auction!

Toronto. The 9cm Elmar was made from 1931 to 1968 – nearly 40 years. It was an early addition to the Leica stable once interchangeable lenses were marketed. The 9cm focal length had a pleasant presentation of head and bust … Continue reading

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a view from above

Toronto. When the novel Leica camera took off in the 1930s, Leitz created a plethora of accessories to allow the tiny marvel to be used for almost every photographic task. Years earlier, folders and box cameras used a viewfinder where … Continue reading

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when a built-in range finder was news

Toronto. Since  before the Leica, Leitz made and sold various range finders. In  the summer of 1932, Leitz announced a new model of their tiny camera with the range finder built-in. A magnification of the scene compensated for its short … Continue reading

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fleet of foot, with fully adjustable slow speeds too

Toronto. In 1935, advertisements pointed out how a particular camera or maker was different. Was superior to the rest. Was a far better buy than the competition. This was especially noticeable in highly competitive America. For example, Leitz NY would … Continue reading

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a lens for all reasons

Toronto. When Leitz first marketed the Leica in the mid 1920s, it was an innovative success. By 1933 other makers had competing cameras out. The mighty Carl Zeiss organization not only marketed cameras, but their Tessar lens was a excellent … Continue reading

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the good, the bad, and the ugly – again

Toronto. The last time I used this title. it was for a Leica accessory . This time it is camera design at and after the mid 1930s and the minicam revolution. Good camera design encompasses many considerations. Ergonomically designed, utilitarian, light, … Continue reading

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black is beautiful

Toronto. In the 1800s and early 1900s, black enamel was a choice for finishing metal. Sewing machines, microscope bases, lamps, and even the ubiquitous Model T Ford all came in the black enamel finish. When Leica cameras were first sold, … Continue reading

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sparking a revolution

Toronto. While Leica wasn’t the first camera to use 35mm movie film, it was one of the first commercially successful 35mm cameras. The tiny marvel was the brain child of Oscar Barnack. The prototype (UR-Leica) was made by Barnack in … Continue reading

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