Tag Archives: glass plate

did ja ever …

Toronto. … see any of deez? When photography began some enterprising folk opened studios to make and sell a ‘likeness’. People wore their Sunday best clothes and flocked to the local studio for a family portrait which was pricy but … Continue reading

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Exposing Photography: Anything But A Small Business

Toronto. My friend Cindy Motzenbecker sent me an email about an upcoming event coinciding with a current exhibit by the Marquette Regional History Center (MRHC). As this will be a ZOOM event, you will need the meeting link. Email me … Continue reading

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the stone kids

Toronto. Giass was king of the photographic base materials for decades covering wet plate, dry plate, and into the film era. Glass was an ideal medium for photography. It was transparent, flat,  grain free – if carefully made – and … Continue reading

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not all bees buzz …

Toronto. My good friend, George Dunbar, sent over this century plus photo with the following words, “This image was published in How Firm a Foundation: A History of the Township of Cramahe and the Village of Colborne in Cramahe’s Digital … Continue reading

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landscapes, streetscapes, and history

Toronto. The old landscapes and streetscapes bring visions of history that no one can see in any other way. Years ago, at one of our fairs, I bought some glass plates from Marlene Cook.  Most of the exposed plates came … Continue reading

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a Jolly Irishman makes photography colourful

Toronto. One of the goals of photography was to let light create natural colour. All the methods possible were recorded by the Frenchman, Louis Ducos du Hauron and based on the experiments of James Clerk Maxwell. Of course today with … Continue reading

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when wet-plate was king

Toronto. Of the two earliest photographic processes, most photographers chose to use the Daguerreotype. It was free (outside England), had the best resolution by far, and had good contrast. But it was limited to one plate unless the plate was … Continue reading

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all sizes great and small

Toronto. From the beginning of analogue (a sensitive coating and emulsion) most cameras were the size of their negative (or in some cases the positive) as prints (if needed) were contact printed. Glass Plate and film sizes varied to match the … Continue reading

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taking its measure

Toronto. While browsing for photo history material, George Dunbar spotted this May 1948 ad for a GE PR-1 selenium exposure meter and shared it with us. To separate the GE meter from others, it was advertised as having a ‘memory’ … Continue reading

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the sky is falling …

Toronto. … or so said Chicken Little in the Children’s fable (I learnt the English version … ). For many years film and glass plates were basically insensitive to blue light (orthochromatic) so clouds and sky exposed for the landscape … Continue reading

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