Tag Archives: Dry Plate

Photographic Canadiana Vol 47-4

Toronto. This is our second issue by interim editors, David Bridge and Louise Freyburger who ably stepped up to the challenge of producing the journal after we lost our previous editor, the late Bob Lansdale, last summer. Members WITH an … Continue reading

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Photographic Canadiana Vol 47-3

Toronto. Sadly, we lost our editor,  Bob Lansdale, this past summer. Bob left much of this material to help our interim editors, David Bridge and Louise Freyburger who ably stepped up to the challenge of producing this issue. Members WITH … Continue reading

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it pays to advertise

Toronto, In 1921, the Mission Art Company, of South Spring Street in Los Angeles sent this  truck cum camera and its phtographers to promote its business. Mark Osterman, who along with his wife, spoke to us back in June of … Continue reading

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time slicers

Toronto. I often think of a shutter as a means to control speed and illumination. However when the image is framed and the shutter button pushed, it captures on film, a ‘slice of time’ in the subject’s life. I have … Continue reading

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a little BIT more

Toronto. Over the years from photography’s beginning in 1839 to current times there have been a few trends. Cameras have gotten smaller. Images became more realistic beginning with monochrome photos across part of the visible spectrum, then across all of … Continue reading

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why the tripod?

Toronto. Did you ever wonder why so many old photos and drawings of cameras in use showed a tripod? Until the dry-plate era, the media were so insensitive that it took  seconds or minutes in bright light to record the … Continue reading

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photographic lenses – Conrad Beck

Toronto. Like most optical houses in the 1800s, The British house of R and J Beck at Cornhill (London, England) expanded their optical product repertoire to photographic lenses (and cameras). In this seventh edition of Conrad Beck’s small book, like … Continue reading

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a c1890 Photosphere camera

Toronto. In 1871, Dr Richard Maddox in the UK announced the dry plate process which replaced wet-plate photography which for decades was a standard process replacing the Daguerreotype in popularity. Dry plate went on to be the under pinnings of … Continue reading

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Getting closer to a universal hobby

Toronto. In 1871, photography crept another step closer to simplicity.  Using gelatin instead of collodion, Dr Maddox was able to create dry plates that were even faster than wet plate technology and for the first time instantaneous pictures (about1/15th of … Continue reading

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An old adage proven

Toronto.. As the saying goes, “The best camera is the one in your hand…” For the first 70 or so years of photography the most important accessory was a good tripod! The sensitive media were so slow it was impossible … Continue reading

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