Tag Archives: advertisement

doing it better (sometimes)

Toronto. On page 31 of the March 1950 edition of Popular Photography, an advertisement touts the Zeiss-Ikon Contax-S camera at whopping price of $475USD with the coated Zeiss Biotar lens. The model S was briefly sold while later models were … Continue reading

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keeping an eye out for colour

Toronto. The earliest photographic processes captured only a monochrome image – usually black and white – of the luminance values of the subject. Over the ensuing decades, many efforts were expended to create natural colour from the effects of light … Continue reading

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not clarifying matters

Toronto. Post WW2 many American companies dreamt up clever ways to gain traction in the booming retail camera market. The Clarus Camera maker in Minneapolis had an added difficulty to overcome – their products suffered from poor quality, especially the … Continue reading

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catching Graflexes

Toronto. Pre WW2 and for a few years there after, Speed Graphic and Graflex cameras reigned supreme as the press photographers’ cameras of choice. The Graflex series offered SLR capability for larger plate and film sizes. Those who saw the … Continue reading

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wither thou goest, Kardon?

Toronto. When America was finally dragged into WW2 on the side of Britain, they  had a problem. The Leitz NY organization was taken over by the US government, but no high quality American made 35mm cameras were available. Peter Kardon … Continue reading

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it pays to advertise

Toronto, In 1921, the Mission Art Company, of South Spring Street in Los Angeles sent this  truck cum camera and its phtographers to promote its business. Mark Osterman, who along with his wife, spoke to us back in June of … Continue reading

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hooray for the old B and J

Toronto. If you believe this old advertisement from August 1943’s Popular Photography magazine, familiar scenes and family snaps were doubly welcomed by America’s fighting men when taken with a 4×5 B&J press camera or were enlarged with a B&J Solar … Continue reading

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nothin’ but blue skies

Toronto. Aerial cameras made many images for maps and other critical analysis functions. This camera was manufactured by a company founded in 1927 as the Fairchild Camera and Instrument company. After WW2, when transistors began to take on the functions … Continue reading

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flogging colour print film in the 1970s

Toronto. At first I thought these were two separate shots showing the superiority of Kodak colour film, since cameras or gift sets didn’t appear in the advertisement. Suddenly, I realized that the vertical white bar was a seam. This photo … Continue reading

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old way of doing it

Toronto. In the late 1960s to early 1970s a company called Synchronex Corporation in the Big Apple sold super 8 movie cameras, audio recorders and movie projectors with a twist. Home movie buffs using their products could record sound on … Continue reading

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