Tag Archives: ad

flogging colour print film in the 1970s

Toronto. At first I thought these were two separate shots showing the superiority of Kodak colour film, since cameras or gift sets didn’t appear in the advertisement. Suddenly, I realized that the vertical white bar was a seam. This photo … Continue reading

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controlling the market

Toronto. For decades Kodak controlled the film market by creating new film sizes and the cameras to use them. Heavy advertising prompted the ill informed public to buy the latest Kodak camera and use Kodak film.  An example is this … Continue reading

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keeping an eye out

Toronto. As this late 1971 LIFE ad for Kodak illustrates, marketeers had to be creative and inspired to create new copy far faster than the engineers and designers could make new cameras with new features. This version of Kodak’s relatively … Continue reading

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big yellow taxi

Toronto.  In the days of film, the exposed film was processed and then printed. Prints and the developed film were returned to the owner. In the US, a company called Fotomat was formed. The company’s business plan was simple: Put … Continue reading

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another way to skin a cat

Toronto. It’s the 1970s and your camera doesn’t have a socket for the ubiquitous magicubes. Nor can it use Kodak’s super simple Instamatic film cartridges. What do you do? Well Yashica advertised that their cameras let you take indoor photos … Continue reading

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taking a bigger slice of the pie

Toronto. Post war, every company in the photographic  industry worked hard to gain a bigger market share. Kodak, as shown by this LIFE ad from the May 7, 1971 issue (p 65), grouped all the hot button ideas into one … Continue reading

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have camera, will travel

Toronto. A collector down in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Mcheconi, wrote about his find some eight or so years ago – a giant baby Rollei.  The oversize camera served as a promotional object and advertisement for the famous Rollei brand. Mcheroni’s … Continue reading

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that Kodak girl again …

Toronto. early last century, Kodak used the popular concept of sex to sell – in this case Kodak cameras. It was the rather wholesome ‘Kodak Girl‘ who became the central person in the  Kodak ads of the era. She illustrated … Continue reading

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a tap in time

Toronto. The old Kodak excelled at deciding what problems affected their customers and how to solve them. Ads like this LIFE ad in the issue of September 25, 1970 addressed one problem and silently showed how two others were solved. … Continue reading

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they’re coming! they’re coming!

Toronto. In this case, it was the Japanese camera makers who moved on to America and Europe after the Korean War. They slowly eliminated both American and most German makers of film cameras. In the latter part of the last … Continue reading

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