Tag Archives: ad

miracle projector

Toronto. The toy advertised back in November, 1949 was hardly a new invention since opaque projectors had been around for decades. This dinky little box sat on a picture about 3×4 inches and  projected it on a screen a few … Continue reading

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pixilated

Toronto. Can you imagine a “fine precision camera” for only $6.25 US including a roll of colour film, shipping and all taxes? No? I can’t either, but that is what the makers claimed in this  July, 1949 ad. The cheap … Continue reading

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a brighter view

Toronto. One issue that Kodak likely had with its folders and box cameras was tiny, dim, viewers. Kodak solved this problem in many ways. One was advertised in the April, 1949 issue of Popular Mechanics – a TLR with a … Continue reading

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Oh Sun-Ray Days

Toronto. When minicams became the norm, enlargers were no longer an option but became a necessity to make prints from the tiny minicam negatives. Amateurs reluctant to buy high end enlargers (Durst, Omega, Beseler, Leitz, etc.)  costing much more than … Continue reading

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so last century!

Toronto. Last century nearly every kid remembers getting a camera or camera kit for Christmas (most likely a Kodak).  Today kids  will still ask for gifts, but not for a camera or camera kit. Instead, top of the list would … Continue reading

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just another ad for the Beacon II

Toronto. George Dunbar came across this ad in Popular Mechanics for July 1948 and shared it with us. I did a couple of posts on this typical box camera and its predecessor (both dressed up to look like the popular … Continue reading

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pirates of New York City

Toronto. Univex (Universal Camera Corp) advertised its Buccaneer 35mm camera in November, 1947, a few years before declaring bankruptcy. Known for their unusual camera designs, the company was said to be ethically challenged. The body of the Buccaneer shown in this … Continue reading

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a Kodak ‘Rollei’

Toronto. In its hey day, Kodak made a variety of camera formats. One was a twin lens reflex design competing in a market held by Rollei at the high and medium end. Like its German competitor, this TLR captured photos … Continue reading

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shooting star

Toronto. This May, 1947 ad from Popular Mechanics touted the Meteor – a cheap 620 camera designed like a 35mm camera – as ideal for “photo-eager folk who want to start on the streamlined path to a great photo-future”. The maker … Continue reading

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all things to all people

Toronto. Mid last century we called Kodak, “The Great Yellow Father”. Kodak was everywhere. To think photography was to think Kodak. Sure other companies touted their photographic wares but Kodak was photography to so many of us. The above advertisement … Continue reading

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