Tag Archives: ad

nothin’ but blue skies

Toronto. Aerial cameras made many images for maps and other critical analysis functions. This camera was manufactured by a company founded in 1927 as the Fairchild Camera and Instrument company. After WW2, when transistors began to take on the functions … Continue reading

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weegee the famous

Toronto. Anyone out there who hasn’t heard of Weegee? Arthur Fellig and his trusty Speed Graphic haunted the streets of New York City mid last Century. He was busy beating cops and firemen to the scene and taking newspaper shots … Continue reading

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brave new world again

Toronto. Well into WW2, Kodak took this ad out in the January 1944 issue of Popular Photography showing how research by their labs resulted in lens technology that out performed the German industry and led to superior fire power when … Continue reading

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Kodak shows its mettle

Toronto. I often make derogatory sounding comments about Kodak, but the company was a force in the industry and for many decades a true leader. Few others had the support and customer base to create new film sizes. In fact … Continue reading

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Leica in Peace and War

Toronto. Before and for awhile after the second world war, the Leica was the most popular high-end 35mm camera sold. As many readers know, before WW2, the German camera industry was the undisputed world leader. During WW2, German technology was … Continue reading

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wild lights

Toronto. Okay, flash is “the next big thing” and you don’t have a flash socket (pc) or a hot shoe. So what can you do?? Welll, if you are Leitz of Leica fame, you could make a base and flash … Continue reading

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flogging colour print film in the 1970s

Toronto. At first I thought these were two separate shots showing the superiority of Kodak colour film, since cameras or gift sets didn’t appear in the advertisement. Suddenly, I realized that the vertical white bar was a seam. This photo … Continue reading

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controlling the market

Toronto. For decades Kodak controlled the film market by creating new film sizes and the cameras to use them. Heavy advertising prompted the ill informed public to buy the latest Kodak camera and use Kodak film.  An example is this … Continue reading

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keeping an eye out

Toronto. As this late 1971 LIFE ad for Kodak illustrates, marketeers had to be creative and inspired to create new copy far faster than the engineers and designers could make new cameras with new features. This version of Kodak’s relatively … Continue reading

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big yellow taxi

Toronto.  In the days of film, the exposed film was processed and then printed. Prints and the developed film were returned to the owner. In the US, a company called Fotomat was formed. The company’s business plan was simple: Put … Continue reading

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