Tag Archives: ad

bravely optimistic

Toronto. The summer of 1943 found America at war on two fronts: in Europe against the onslaught of Hitler and in the Pacific against Hirohito and the Japanese. At this time, native American industries swung over to war production with … Continue reading

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rolling with the punches

Toronto. This ad appeared in the September, 1939 issue of Popular Mechanics. At the time, Burleigh Brooks was the American importer of various German cameras including the Rollei. This ad was likely submitted about 3 months earlier in June of … Continue reading

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who needs bells and whistles?

Toronto. 1939 – what a year! The great depression of the dirty ’30s was a decade old and rapidly becoming part of the landscape. One of the worst wars ever (WW2) was about to erupt in Europe inspite of Hitler’s … Continue reading

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watch da birdie

Toronto. As WW2 was winding down, companies became more innovative in their advertising. Pepsi-Cola – the major competitor to Coke – tried a humorous approach using a cartoon based on the old idea of a studio photographer capturing a portrait … Continue reading

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flexing some muscle

Toronto. Argus was known for American made cameras, especially the ‘brick‘ – the Argus C3. However, the company also dabbled in TLR designs. This ad shown at left is for the Argoflex – Likely a model E given the date … Continue reading

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good lord! a Deardorff!

Toronto. Things that seemed so important decades ago are not even a consideration today. This advertisement from the January, 1930 magazine called American Cinematographer is a case in point. A rising and falling front with a short focus lens was … Continue reading

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getcha daily colour here!

Toronto. The Universal Camera Corporation in the Big Apple (NYC) made many still cameras such as the popular Mercury with the weird circular shutter. They also made movie cameras and projectors. This ad appeared in the August, 1941 issue of … Continue reading

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will do anything to get a sale

Toronto, The August, 1941 issue of Popular Mechanics ran an advertisement for a camera called the “Midget Marvel”. It was offered for less than $9 American including the leather case. Some different cameras used the same name, so I am … Continue reading

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perhaps well named?

Toronto. The December 1925 issue of American Cinematographer carried an ad for the Debrie Interview, model E camera called “The Greatest of all Motion Picture cameras”. It was said to be ‘light’ at 14 pounds. With a body made of … Continue reading

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trying to climb aboard the amateur photo express

Toronto. Talk about bad timing! This ad for a cheap Agfa camera “made in U.S.A.” appears in the July 1941 issue of Popular Mechanics. A few months later in December of that year, Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and the … Continue reading

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