Tag Archives: 35mm

Automat? What about a Lordomat 35mm lens?

Toronto. If you like watching old movies, you have likely seen the famous Automat cafeteria in NYC. These automated restaurants were threatened and often ‘ate’ up by by the growth of fast food outlets. Sadly our camera industry was no … Continue reading

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hi-yo kinamo

Toronto. In April, 1923 this ad appeared in the American Cinematographer. ICA in Germany announced its 35mm (standard film) Kinamo camera – the smallest movie camera of the time. The Kinamo was designed for both professionals and (advanced) amateurs, hence … Continue reading

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lucky seven

Toronto. We occasionally see a SEPT camera offered at one of our events. The ad at left is from the January 1923 edition of the American Cinematographer. While the little Sept is described as a ‘movie camera’ in this ad, … Continue reading

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tiny, I can see you

Toronto. The makers of rangefinder cameras such as the Leica went to great lengths with accessories to allow the cameras to be used for any photographic project. On page 85 of the April 1951 Popular Photography magazine, Leitz NY ran … Continue reading

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tweet, tweet

Toronto. This camera was ‘for the birds’, or was it?  This advertisement by Direct Products Corp. in NYC appeared on page 125 in the June, 1950 issue of Popular Photography (about the only year the camera was around over here, … Continue reading

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look-a-like-a-leica

Toronto. After WW2, the world was inundated with Leica lookalikes. Some were  flat out copies like the Russian FED and Zorki models; some were copies of Leica features like Canon; and some were marketed as improvements on Leica like the … Continue reading

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how to fail without really trying …

Toronto. “What the heck is a photon, anyway?”, you may ask. Actually, it is a measure of light. In 1948, Bell & Howell misspelt the word to create a unique name for its still camera, as is often the case … Continue reading

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sometimes we are elegant

Toronto. Kodak was known for its films and photographic supplies. The company, once the leader in photography, in later years made inexpensive and rather ugly plastic ‘film burners’, readily bought by the general public as gifts or to record family … Continue reading

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was ist das?

Toronto. Post WW2, umpteen American companies tried to hop on the American made camera bandwagon. One was the Vokar line made in Dexter, Michigan. The design was said to have originated pre war from the mind of Dick Bills. Mike … Continue reading

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a Mitchin great camera

Toronto. Did you ever see a movie in the days when movie scenes were captured on 35 or 16 mm film? Well the chances are a Mitchell camera was used! Mitchell Cameras took over from Bell & Howell a few … Continue reading

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