Tag Archives: 16mm

what ever happened to Pellex Film?

Toronto. An advertisement in the October, 1933 issue of American Cinematographer by the Pellex  Film Company extolled the virtues of its 16mm fine grain and economy films for “all 16mm cameras”.  The films were B&W orthochromatic media in the days … Continue reading

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fade to black

Toronto. Professional movies shot on 35mm film or larger used a variety of techniques to switch the film – and audience – from one scene to the next. In one method, the scene ending was slowly faded out while the … Continue reading

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will that be 8 or 16?

Toronto. Bell & Howell was a respected name in Hollywood movie equipment. For home movies, they used the “Filmo” brand. In the March 1940 issue of Popular Mechanics, B&H advertised both the 8mm and the 16mm versions of their Filmo … Continue reading

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to the victor …

Toronto. … go the spoils (well, most times). Do you remember the Victor 16mm movie gear? The majority of their products suffered from very small sales. A government contract during WW2 was far more promising as was their knockoff of … Continue reading

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how to introduce a new revolutionary product

Toronto. Leitz, a few years earlier, taught photographers the virtues of an enlarged small negative to introduce their novel little camera with small negatives. Traditionally, much larger cameras were used. The camera size determined the size of the final print … Continue reading

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a Mitchin great camera

Toronto. Did you ever see a movie in the days when movie scenes were captured on 35 or 16 mm film? Well the chances are a Mitchell camera was used! Mitchell Cameras took over from Bell & Howell a few … Continue reading

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what a combination!

Toronto. Movies and Electronics (not the typical science fiction variety movie) came together in the 1930s to extend human understanding. The 1930s were an exciting time (aside from the devastating depression) in photography and in electronics, The minicam revolution gained … Continue reading

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amping it up

Toronto. When I was a school kid in grades 7 and 8 a few years after WW2, I was also an occasional  projectionist for junior classes. We showed 16mm educational movies on (to me) a massive Ampro 20 sound projector. … Continue reading

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automation and home movies

Toronto. If you were to believe the marketeers who wrote this ad found on page 24 of the October 8, 1956 issue of LIFE magazine, the 200EE camera is so simple a child could take perfect movies. Yeah! Right! This … Continue reading

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Bolex joins the game

Toronto. After the world-wide 1929 stock market crash ushered in the great depression, many small companies failed. BOL SA, founded by Jacques Bogopolsky, was one of them. A Swiss company, it made cameras for cine. Paillard SA made watch parts, … Continue reading

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