Tag Archives: portrait

How to Take a Good Portrait Photo

Toronto. Another great article appeared recently in the blog “How-To Geek” This article, “How to Take a Good Portrait Photo was written by Harry Guinness (he updated the article August 18th). Harry’s advice is just as solid today as it … Continue reading

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taking the red-eye out

Toronto. When we hear that phrase today, we think the speaker is flying over-night to the coast to wake up bleary eyed and fuzzy for breakfast thousands of miles from home But that wasn’t always so. In the 1950s, colour … Continue reading

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spot on

Toronto. One big difference between amateur photographs, and those made by professionals and advanced amateurs, was illumination. Indoors, the professional went to great lengths to illuminate his subject bringing out the nuances of its very existence whether a human, an … Continue reading

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its the dye, silly

Toronto. In the days of colour film, it was somewhat common knowledge that colour photos faded badly and didn’t last. 60 years ago it was appropriate to get a mix of colour and B&W prints to commemorate special occasions like … Continue reading

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have camera, will travel

Toronto. The dirty ’30s! What a terrible time. What a wonderful time. Itinerant photographers, known since the beginning of the art, roamed the streets searching for a buck. Many had just a camera plus a pony and assistant for a … Continue reading

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Bill’s World

Toronto. In 1995, McClelland & Stewart, Inc (then a famous Canadian Publishing House) published a Canadian edition of¬†“The World of William Notman” written by Hall, Dodds and Triggs. The lavish book had a history of the Notman Studios and a … Continue reading

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swingin’ at the seance

Toronto. Did you ever notice that the earliest daguerreotypes where a bit odd? Street scenes showed vehicles or people as ghostly apparitions at best. And people shots were mostly very, very stiff, formal studio portraits. Scenes in motion or at … Continue reading

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… and how do you like your steak?

Toronto. Medium? Well, for the Hasselblad it is a 150mm lens that is a medium. Medium telephoto that is. Great for portraits on a Hasselblad, that is. Like a 90mm Elmar on a Leica. At an auction a while back … Continue reading

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all that glitters…

Toronto. At the December meeting, Clint showed a second image after the Keystone Eye Comfort series. This image is an Ambrotype¬†(c1850 – 60s) of a soldier. The image is hand coloured with tiny gilt trim on the buttons. A member … Continue reading

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those wonderful old Graflex cameras of yesteryear

Toronto. what a great year! 1922. And Folmer and Schwing, a Kodak division at the time, advertised in Vanity Fair with this attractive portrait of a little girl. Charming portrait. Charming camera. The Folmer & Schwing company had a complicated … Continue reading

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