Tag Archives: lens

silver and glass

Toronto. George Dunbar came across this article on Kodak’s work on films and lenses. It appeared as the article “Brains of Sliver — Eyes of Glass” in the April 1930 edition of Science and Invention magazine. The article covers Kodak’s … Continue reading

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what’s leaves got to do with it

Toronto. Falling leaves. Cold. Damp. Windy. November in the city and winter is about to rush in. As I write this post on the 1st, we are seeing our first snow flurries of the coming season. Leaves have a lot … Continue reading

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that’s how the light gets in – II

Toronto. When the Daguerreotype process was announced in January 1839, it was so slow that only still life and landscape views could be recorded. The news of the process speed resulted in a two direction thrust: chemically, to enhance the … Continue reading

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don’t let the light get in

Toronto. Cameras are all the same in one sense whether they cost pennies or thousands of dollars: they are a light tight box separating a light sensitive medium from a lens so that any object at infinity is in focus … Continue reading

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Okey-Bokehy

Toronto. A recent post on depth of field prompted a note from my friend George Dunbar along with a photo for a red IBM ¬†Selectric typewriter (remember those machines with the flying golf balls of interchangeable typefaces?). For the ad, … Continue reading

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controlling depth of field

Toronto. As a general rule, the longer the focal length of a lens, the smaller its maximum possible f/stop and the less its depth of field. Conversely, the shorter the focal length, the greater the depth of field and the … Continue reading

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photographica c1925

Toronto. The magazine Science & Industry¬†addressed the wide audience of tinkers and experimenters (mostly boys and youths) and as such it included a wide range of things. In this example article, a camera is shown, but unnamed. The take home … Continue reading

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down periscope …

Toronto. Do you remember submarine movies? Somewhere in the plot you would hear “down periscope” before a dive alarm sounded. Recently, I was surprised to see the term being used today to refer to a smartphone-sized telephoto lens design, By … Continue reading

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i am so EXCITED …

Toronto. … as Martin Short‘s character, Ed Grimsley, used to shout on SCTV skits. To do the character justice, Short was down right hyper. And speaking of hyper, hyperfocal distance was important in 35mm film photography, especially daytime street photography. … Continue reading

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shady stuff

Toronto. Don’t you wish your photos were crisp and contrasty like those of an accomplished professional? One issue last century was soft contrast caused by reflections from individual lens elements. Post war, element coating became common and with it a … Continue reading

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