Tag Archives: Leica

the long and the short of it

Toronto. In the 1930s, Leitz sold a special short mount coded as COOED for the ELANG 9 cm f/4 Elmar lens head. This strange focusing mount and lens head were intended for use on the rotating focusing stage coded OORES … Continue reading

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a loopy idea

Toronto. I show three magnifier loupes at the left. The first is a Taylor, Taylor, Hobson brass loupe used in the late 1800s to focus a lens on the massive old field/studio cameras so that the subject was sharp on … Continue reading

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valau for money

Toronto. Leitz first introduced the Leica in the mid 1920s to keep employment up at their optical works in Wetzlar during extreme inflation in Germany. Bad timing as it turned out. A few years later, the dirty 30s hit with … Continue reading

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it’s complicated

Toronto. Photographic product makers worked hard at besting one another to capture a larger segment of the ever growing amateur photography market. Typical of the strategy was this May 1969 ad in LIFE magazine touting Polaroid. The ad emphasizes its … Continue reading

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and who might you be?

Toronto, … asked my wife’s 90+ year old aunt many years ago. ¬†The image at left was recently developed. It was from an exposed roll of film (from a bulk roll) exposed in the 1930s Leica IIIa. The film was … Continue reading

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quite a mouthful

Toronto. In the 1950s, the German company Stubner¬†(or Stuber – did he work for Leitz?) made these cable releases. When sold by Leitz for the Leica, they were signed Leitz on the raised button and a 10 inch cable release … Continue reading

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every one should have one …

Toronto. … said the late Ted Shepherd. So I agreed to buy his flash gun (CEYOO) with its folding plastic base (CTOOM) at our November 21, 1978 meeting in the NorthYork Public Library. A few days later, I sent a … Continue reading

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what’s in YOUR collection?

Toronto. When the PHSC was established back in 1974 the majority of members were camera (and lens) collectors. While many collectors had an eclectic taste, others collected by maker (eg. Leica, Zeiss, Ernemann, Kodak, etc.), or by date or price … Continue reading

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the time has come, the walrus said …

Toronto. When photography first burst forth in 1839, lenses were made by opticians and cameras by them or others. As time progressed, optical houses began to make both cameras and lenses. Some like Zeiss also made lenses for others. By … Continue reading

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nice Zeiss lens

Toronto. In 1926 Zeiss formed Zeiss-Ikon for its government. The goal was to streamline the redundant over-lapping cameras made by the German camera factories. Belatedly, about a decade later, Zeiss realized that the minicam had taken over the amateur box/folder … Continue reading

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