Tag Archives: Leica

every one should have one …

Toronto. … said the late Ted Shepherd. So I agreed to buy his flash gun (CEYOO) with its folding plastic base (CTOOM) at our November 21, 1978 meeting in the NorthYork Public Library. A few days later, I sent a … Continue reading

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what’s in YOUR collection?

Toronto. When the PHSC was established back in 1974 the majority of members were camera (and lens) collectors. While many collectors had an eclectic taste, others collected by maker (eg. Leica, Zeiss, Ernemann, Kodak, etc.), or by date or price … Continue reading

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the time has come, the walrus said …

Toronto. When photography first burst forth in 1839, lenses were made by opticians and cameras by them or others. As time progressed, optical houses began to make both cameras and lenses. Some like Zeiss also made lenses for others. By … Continue reading

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nice Zeiss lens

Toronto. In 1926 Zeiss formed Zeiss-Ikon for its government. The goal was to streamline the redundant over-lapping cameras made by the German camera factories. Belatedly, about a decade later, Zeiss realized that the minicam had taken over the amateur box/folder … Continue reading

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ringy thingy

Toronto. Leitz may have just as well used a variant of the early iPhone tag line: “There’s an app for that”, using, “There’s an acc (accessory) for that” instead. In the early years, Leitz made slip-on filters for the petite … Continue reading

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slow train

Toronto. In the early years of the minicam, leaf shutters were often used to allow for slow speeds. The early focal plane shutter Leicas had speeds from about   1/500 second down to about 1/20th second when both curtains were … Continue reading

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once upon a time in Canada

Toronto. A few years after the second world war ended, Ernst Leitz established a factory in Midland, Ontario. At this subsidiary factory cameras were assembled from Wetzlar parts, manufactured, and lenses were assembled, manufactured and designed. In our journal, issue … Continue reading

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boxes, bellows, and beyond

Toronto. Most of the early cameras were big boxy things with relatively small diameter lenses. Early on you changed lenses to change angles of view (wide angle, telephoto) always mindful of the diameter of the circle of confusion – or … Continue reading

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minicams and interchangeability

Toronto. The 35mm cameras were off and running in the late 1920s. Leitz touted their Leica as a precision camera and set out to compete with the physically far bigger cameras of the day, claiming that a small negative could … Continue reading

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the keepers of night

Toronto. Since photography began there was always some means to keep the plates or film protected from the light.  When the Leica and its competitors arrived. Leitz made a very heavy and elaborate reusable cassette that opened only in-camera as … Continue reading

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