Tag Archives: Leica

once upon a time in Canada

Toronto. A few years after the second world war ended, Ernst Leitz established a factory in Midland, Ontario. At this subsidiary factory cameras were assembled from Wetzlar parts, manufactured, and lenses were assembled, manufactured and designed. In our journal, issue … Continue reading

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boxes, bellows, and beyond

Toronto. Most of the early cameras were big boxy things with relatively small diameter lenses. Early on you changed lenses to change angles of view (wide angle, telephoto) always mindful of the diameter of the circle of confusion – or … Continue reading

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minicams and interchangeability

Toronto. The 35mm cameras were off and running in the late 1920s. Leitz touted their Leica as a precision camera and set out to compete with the physically far bigger cameras of the day, claiming that a small negative could … Continue reading

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the keepers of night

Toronto. Since photography began there was always some means to keep the plates or film protected from the light.  When the Leica and its competitors arrived. Leitz made a very heavy and elaborate reusable cassette that opened only in-camera as … Continue reading

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and to cap it off …

Toronto. Dust and dirt everywhere! How can you keep it out of camera bodies and lenses? Easy, cap the openings! Since the early days of photography, caps have been used to keep out dust and dirt when the camera or … Continue reading

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hardly ever

Toronto. In the late 1950s, I bought my Exakta VX IIa complete with an “ever-ready” case. Like many youths of the day, we called these “never-ready”cases since the camera couldn’t be used until the case was opened. When the box … Continue reading

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ghosties and ghoulies …

Toronto. … and things that go bump in the night. An old saying to scare children silly in the days before electrical lighting. In the 19th century, few people understood exactly how photography worked. These folk often fell victim to … Continue reading

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Rokkin’ lenses

Toronto. By 1963, the Japanese Optical industry was a tsunami roaring across the Western world. No longer viewed as copy cats of German technology, Japan was rightfully recognized as a serious contender for high quality optical products. A December 6, … Continue reading

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a Canadian icon dies at 90

Toronto. I received an email Friday from George Dunbar. He happened to browse a copy of the Globe on Thursday. George writes in part, “Did you see the huge (two-page) obit for photographer Ted Grant in Thursday’s Globe & Mail? … Continue reading

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pus ça change

Toronto. It is said that the more things change, the more they are the same. Like the Zeiss Sonnar lens for example. Larry Gubas in his massive text “Zeiss and Photography” shows the Sonnar as it was initially sold in … Continue reading

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