Tag Archives: Kodak

if it moves, shoot it …

Toronto. An old military saying was, “If it moves salute it; if not, paint it”. My colour blind uncle was a painter on a military base after the end of WW2. He told me the paint tins were marked to … Continue reading

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stretching it

Toronto. Good friend, PHSC member, and photographic historian George Dunbar shared this bit of whimsey with me. The February 1928 issue of “Science and Invention” included an article titled, “Enlarging Photos by Stretching” attributed to an “A W Herbert”. Herbert … Continue reading

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colour home movies in 1929

Toronto. Even today, we use ways to separate and re-combine primary colours to create realistic viewable colour images, be they prints, computer screens, smartphones, or TV. The concept itself is over a century and a half old. James Clerk Maxwell demonstrated … Continue reading

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most gifted

Toronto. Today when someone says, “most gifted”, we usually think of a very bright child worthy of accelerated and/or in-depth learning. Today, when we think of compact cameras we usually mean smartphones. In the summer of 1967, a Kodak advertisement … Continue reading

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a hint to the future of colour photography

Toronto. In February 1931, the magazine Science and Invention had this brief note on the status of a new colour process taken on by Kodak. It modestly states, “These processes are said to be as simple as those involved in … Continue reading

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brave new world

Toronto. Today, almost everyone has a smartphone that includes a sophisticated digital camera and editing apps. Stills, selfies, and videos are taken incessantly. With some care, and little or no photographic skill, people capture a decent image. In fact, they … Continue reading

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ruby red window

Toronto. George Eastman’s company announced the Kodak camera in 1888.  Kodak used roll film – originally in 100 exposure rolls. Exposed films were processed and cameras refilled by the Eastman Co. Now, have you ever thought of an easy way … Continue reading

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it’s in the bag

Toronto.  Remember film? The exposed film had to be processed so the results (good, bad, or indifferent) could be viewed. For years Kodachrome was purchased with processing included, but along the line the American government decreed Kodak had to separate … Continue reading

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the keepers of night

Toronto. Since photography began there was always some means to keep the plates or film protected from the light.  When the Leica and its competitors arrived. Leitz made a very heavy and elaborate reusable cassette that opened only in-camera as … Continue reading

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to dye for

Toronto. By mid last century we had Kodachrome and its competition to give us good colour transparencies. They or the original subject could also be photographed on three monochrome negatives through colour filters to give one negative per narrow colour … Continue reading

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