Tag Archives: Kodak

what the deuce is a duex?

Toronto. In the days of film, Kodak was well known for its many inexpensive cameras. Kodak made its money by the sale of film and other materials. The cheap but sturdy cameras were great film burners! This inexpensive camera was … Continue reading

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it’s a long way

Toronto. One of the popular cameras in the great war was the Kodak VP folder. Not only did it use the newly released 127 size roll film, it was small, metal bodied, and compact. A soldier could slip it in … Continue reading

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simplicity again

Toronto. In the late 1960s, Kodak aggressively pushed its ads to capture the low end of the home movie market. My October 14th post, “eulogy for simplicity” showed one ad Kodak used in this approach. This teaser ad shows another … Continue reading

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eulogy for simplicity

Toronto. Kodak made its money in the days of film by selling, ummm, film. And to do that, Kodak sold inexpensive cameras – film burners. But with seemingly a big difference to its competitors – they listened to their customers. … Continue reading

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if it moves, shoot it …

Toronto. An old military saying was, “If it moves salute it; if not, paint it”. My colour blind uncle was a painter on a military base after the end of WW2. He told me the paint tins were marked to … Continue reading

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stretching it

Toronto. Good friend, PHSC member, and photographic historian George Dunbar shared this bit of whimsey with me. The February 1928 issue of “Science and Invention” included an article titled, “Enlarging Photos by Stretching” attributed to an “A W Herbert”. Herbert … Continue reading

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colour home movies in 1929

Toronto. Even today, we use ways to separate and re-combine primary colours to create realistic viewable colour images, be they prints, computer screens, smartphones, or TV. The concept itself is over a century and a half old.┬áJames Clerk Maxwell demonstrated … Continue reading

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most gifted

Toronto. Today when someone says, “most gifted”, we usually think of a very bright child worthy of accelerated and/or in-depth learning. Today, when we think of compact cameras we usually mean smartphones. In the summer of 1967, a Kodak advertisement … Continue reading

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a hint to the future of colour photography

Toronto. In February 1931, the magazine Science and Invention had this brief note on the status of a new colour process taken on by Kodak. It modestly states, “These processes are said to be as simple as those involved in … Continue reading

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brave new world

Toronto. Today, almost everyone has a smartphone that includes a sophisticated digital camera and editing apps. Stills, selfies, and videos are taken incessantly. With some care, and little or no photographic skill, people capture a decent image. In fact, they … Continue reading

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