Tag Archives: flash

who ya gonna call – II?

Toronto. Who ya gonna call when you want people in middle class America to know about your fresh egg and do some digging? LIFE magazine, that’s who! In the March 8, 1969 issue, a full page ad on page 19 … Continue reading

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faster than a speeding bullet

Toronto. When photography was invented, exposures were measured in minutes. Between then and the end of film’s popularity something happened: Speed. The light sensitive media and lenses through research and innovation became much faster. In fact, after dry plates arrived, … Continue reading

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making it better

Toronto. Flashcubes had four tiny flash bulbs and allowed four flash shots by rotating 90 degrees after each shot. Magic cubes looked the same but were ignited by mechanical energy instead of batteries. In 1967, Honeywell made two¬†flashcube alternatives for … Continue reading

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a dash of flash

Toronto. In the early days of flash, these high speed demons ¬†emulated flash bulbs – you set the aperture, and shutter based on subject to camera distance, film speed rating and shutter syncronization maximum speed. All this changed with Honeywell’s … Continue reading

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flash … bang …

Toronto. In the 19th and early 20th century indoor and night photography required flash for a decent exposure. Unfortunately, the magnesium powder that created a bright light when ignited was unstable and unless great care was taken, it would suddenly … Continue reading

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both sides now

Toronto. Most of us collect photographs as well as cameras, equipment, books, ephemera, etc. The photographs are usually selected for their process, quality, studio, or possibly subject matter. The picture at left is a positive image of a 4×5 dry … Continue reading

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things go better …

Toronto. … with Coke, or so they say. In 1964 Coke used a B&W copy of this advertisement to inform the general public that both Coke and Coca-Cola are the trademarks of the same big company. A camera signified just … Continue reading

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lipstick

Toronto. The Brownie Super 27 camera was advertised and sold in the early 1960s. It was basically a tarted up Baby Brownie: bigger viewfinder, built in flash, better lens at f/8, two speed shutter (but failure prone apparently), horizontal construction … Continue reading

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film savings nearly 60 years ago

Toronto. My good friend George Dunbar is a fabulous source of suggestions and inspirations as he pursues photographic history as reflected in magazine advertisements last century. Today’s item stems from George’s email a few days back showing a collaboration between … Continue reading

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splish, splash, flash

Toronto. In the mid last century, these bulbs and guns were all the rage. They were replaced by cheap electronic flashguns that also went through changes. The mid blue coating on the bulbs allowed outdoor colour film to be used … Continue reading

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