Tag Archives: daguerreotype

1839 and all that

Toronto. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Magazine in the Big Apple offers many interesting talks about photography. In this one, conservator Lee Ann Daffner of MoMA thoughtfully treats the tarnish on a c1842 daguerreotype by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey. Listen to this … Continue reading

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what were they thinking?

Toronto. Today, we all take photography for granted. Images are shot endlessly to record things once written, or capture family moments, or pets, or property changes, etc. We leave news, tv, political, formal portraits, etc. images to the professionals. With … Continue reading

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Dr Mike goes to Washington

Toronto. My friend George Dunbar sent me a note the other day saying one of our past presidents, Dr Mike Robinson, was visiting the Smithsonian to demonstrate modern day daguerreotype portraits. Mike makes such collectible images here in his Century … Continue reading

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NYC? not this April …

Toronto. I just received word today that the NY Photography Fair, which I announced in a post on February 22nd, has been cancelled in anticipation of the New Corona Virus pandemic hitting the States in the coming weeks. We wish … Continue reading

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swingin’ at the seance

Toronto. Did you ever notice that the earliest daguerreotypes where a bit odd? Street scenes showed vehicles or people as ghostly apparitions at best. And people shots were mostly very, very stiff, formal studio portraits. Scenes in motion or at … Continue reading

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happy birthday Louie

Toronto. On November 18th, 1787 – a mere 232 years ago, Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre was born. And in January 1839 the most important announcement was made: Daguerre (yes this Daguerre) had invented photography. His process created the daguerreotype, a … Continue reading

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miner 49er

Toronto. The Daguerreian Society is a scholarly organization more dedicated to the first photographic process than even France, the home of Louis Daguerre! This is obvious from the effort expended in its Symposiums, Annuals, and Quarterlies (the 28 page DSQ … Continue reading

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first photograph taken in what became Canada after confederation July 1, 1867

Toronto. In 1840, an English businessman  called Hugh Lee Pattinson in a trip around the known parts of North America, used the the new daguerreotype technology to record spectacular areas of the world.  In British North America, he recorded the … Continue reading

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more information on the recovered daguerreotype images

Toronto. Two days ago I posted a note on using x-rays to bring out daguerreotype images long thought lost in damage and tarnish. The earlier article was printed in the Globe and called to my attention by John Linsky. This … Continue reading

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x-rays reveal an image hidden by damage

Toronto. I had a call from John Linsky Friday morning as I was making breakfast. John had read an article in the Globe that morning regarding the discovery of images on a daguerreotype thought to be long lost. The scientists … Continue reading

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