Tag Archives: close up

time to learn more …

Toronto. Our friends down in Niagara are tackling the current COVID-19 pandemic with a series of on line speakers. The NFRCC is linking with Hunt’s Photo and Video in New England to present their monthly speaker program. The NFRCC says, “[it] is … Continue reading

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bean bag boogie

Toronto. With the proliferation of fast cameras and films, photographers began to search for a simple support to rest the camera or long lens on. More flexible than a tripod; steadier than hand held, especially when depth of field was … Continue reading

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the good, the bad, and the ugly

Toronto. When it comes to accessories for the Leica, the ZOOXY and its brethren are right up there as candidates for the ugly prize. The massive weighty thing is a focusing mount and extension tube that connects to an OOZAB … Continue reading

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a COOMI cutie

Toronto. In the post WW2 days of film, you could make close-ups by placing an extension tube between camera body and lens or by adding a close up lens (+1,  +2, or +3 diopter) element to the front of the … Continue reading

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a closer look

Toronto. For many years the convention for mini-cams was infinity down to one metre (1m). Many normal lenses for the Leica followed this standard leading to a variety of means to frame and focus in the macro range – closer … Continue reading

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metal spiders and close-up photography

Toronto. I bought Herbie over a half century ago in this fair city. Herbie is a lucky Danish spider and once had a thread from its tummy for hanging it vertically. Spider legs (and filaments) were also used in photography. … Continue reading

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nearer your destination

Toronto. When Oskar Barnack created the Leica he used lenses focussing from 1 metre to infinity. Many users wanted to use the tiny marvels closer than 1 metre. This was solved for copying by various devices and stands. To use … Continue reading

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close-ups with a Leica

Toronto. For many years Leitz made standard lenses for the Leica that focussed as close as a metre. Want to get closer? Too bad. This all changed in around 1927 when Leitz offered supplementary front lenses for its standard 50mm … Continue reading

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Keep your eye on the ball

Toronto. With a growing interest in close-up photography, in July of 1979 I bought a used copy of Dr Otto Croy’s  book Camera Close-up originally published in England and America by Focal Press of England in 1961. L. A. Mannheim translated … Continue reading

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Between a rock and a hard place…

Toronto. Close-up photography was generally used to close the gap between close photography – say a metre – and a low power microscope. On the 35mm frame the object was about 1/4 to 1/1  life size. In the early 20th … Continue reading

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