Tag Archives: ad

making it better

Toronto. Flashcubes had four tiny flash bulbs and allowed four flash shots by rotating 90 degrees after each shot. Magic cubes looked the same but were ignited by mechanical energy instead of batteries. In 1967, Honeywell made two flashcube alternatives for … Continue reading

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a dash of flash

Toronto. In the early days of flash, these high speed demons  emulated flash bulbs – you set the aperture, and shutter based on subject to camera distance, film speed rating and shutter syncronization maximum speed. All this changed with Honeywell’s … Continue reading

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follow da money

Toronto. When I was a kid, magazines were rife with ads offering ways to get rich. These ads made it seem so easy. The ad at left, was aimed at wishful future photographers. The ad even promised a free “professional … Continue reading

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it’s in the bag

Toronto.  Remember film? The exposed film had to be processed so the results (good, bad, or indifferent) could be viewed. For years Kodachrome was purchased with processing included, but along the line the American government decreed Kodak had to separate … Continue reading

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hop on the band wagon

Toronto. Last century many new (to North America and Europe) camera makers incorporated and touted the latest fads hoping to increase market share. Yashica was no exception with its Electro 35. Yashica used Space Age, Atomic age, and Transistors while … Continue reading

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swinging ’60s

Toronto. The swinging ’60s! What a glorious time to be alive! In that era Polaroid introduced it’s most popular camera of all, the Swinger. This simplified camera took black and white photos, developed outside the camera and gave you a … Continue reading

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things go better …

Toronto. … with Coke, or so they say. In 1964 Coke used a B&W copy of this advertisement to inform the general public that both Coke and Coca-Cola are the trademarks of the same big company. A camera signified just … Continue reading

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gizmos and gadgets

Toronto, In the 1960s, camera makers fought to gain market share. A fresh idea might be swept up by the competition – or left to linger and die an orphan. Ricoh cameras were made by Riken Optical in Japan. According … Continue reading

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Rokkin’ lenses

Toronto. By 1963, the Japanese Optical industry was a tsunami roaring across the Western world. No longer viewed as copy cats of German technology, Japan was rightfully recognized as a serious contender for high quality optical products. A December 6, … Continue reading

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if you can read …

Toronto. … you can learn! Or so the American “Famous”schools touted last century.  Famous Artists School and Famous Writers School operated by correspondence on the premise that reading could make you an artist or writer.  In the same spirit, Famous … Continue reading

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