Category Archives: history

i am so EXCITED …

Toronto. … as Martin Short‘s character, Ed Grimsley, used to shout on SCTV skits. To do the character justice, Short was down right hyper. And speaking of hyper, hyperfocal distance was important in 35mm film photography, especially daytime street photography. … Continue reading

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shady stuff

Toronto. Don’t you wish your photos were crisp and contrasty like those of an accomplished professional? One issue last century was soft contrast caused by reflections from individual lens elements. Post war, element coating became common and with it a … Continue reading

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and to cap it off …

Toronto. Dust and dirt everywhere! How can you keep it out of camera bodies and lenses? Easy, cap the openings! Since the early days of photography, caps have been used to keep out dust and dirt when the camera or … Continue reading

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hardly ever

Toronto. In the late 1950s, I bought my Exakta VX IIa complete with an “ever-ready” case. Like many youths of the day, we called these “never-ready”cases since the camera couldn’t be used until the case was opened. When the box … Continue reading

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spot on

Toronto. One big difference between amateur photographs, and those made by professionals and advanced amateurs, was illumination. Indoors, the professional went to great lengths to illuminate his subject bringing out the nuances of its very existence whether a human, an … Continue reading

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green and it’s gone

Toronto. Have you ever watched a girl like this showing off fashion articles in exotic places? Or a weather girl on TV and saw the various detailed weather maps and videos behind her? Or joined a ZOOM meeting where participants … Continue reading

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the invisible man

Toronto. Photography was a success when latent images were discovered (plus a fixer solution). Silver salts, or silver-halides as they were later called were molecules of silver and a “salt” bonded together. These molecules were light sensitive. The stronger the … Continue reading

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a colourful French gentleman

Toronto. It’s nearly three years since I first posted a note about Louis Ducos du Hauron and his contribution to colour photography. After Ducos du Hauron learnt about the three colour theory of vision, he predicted almost all the ways … Continue reading

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to dye for

Toronto. By mid last century we had Kodachrome and its competition to give us good colour transparencies. They or the original subject could also be photographed on three monochrome negatives through colour filters to give one negative per narrow colour … Continue reading

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3-in-1

Toronto. Studies in the late 1800s proved three colour bands would create the full spectrum of visible light. Many attempts were made to create the plates necessary for this effort in a reasonable time. For about the first half of … Continue reading

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