Category Archives: history

All About Enlargers – Part A

Toronto. What do you do when a photograph negative is too small? Enlarge it! You may be surprised to learn that enlarging apparatus came along well before the minicam revolution of the 1930s. In this special members-only supplement (vol 1-6) … Continue reading

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THINK … small

Toronto. Decades ago, people said that to get ahead, one had to think big! IBM even had a catch phrase – THINK. Years later when I worked in  a data centre,  IBM folk could get these IBM signs in capital … Continue reading

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and who might you be?

Toronto, … asked my wife’s 90+ year old aunt many years ago.  The image at left was recently developed. It was from an exposed roll of film (from a bulk roll) exposed in the 1930s Leica IIIa. The film was … Continue reading

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amping it up

Toronto. When I was a school kid in grades 7 and 8 a few years after WW2, I was also an occasional  projectionist for junior classes. We showed 16mm educational movies on (to me) a massive Ampro 20 sound projector. … Continue reading

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quite a mouthful

Toronto. In the 1930s, the German company Stuber made these cable releases. When sold by Leitz for the Leica, they were signed Leitz on the raised button and a 10 inch cable release for screw mount cameras was included. The … Continue reading

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silver and glass

Toronto. George Dunbar came across this article on Kodak’s work on films and lenses. It appeared as the article “Brains of Sliver — Eyes of Glass” in the April 1930 edition of Science and Invention magazine. The article covers Kodak’s … Continue reading

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every one should have one …

Toronto. … said the late Ted Shepherd. So I agreed to buy his flash gun (CEYOO) with its folding plastic base (CTOOM) at our November 21, 1978 meeting in the NorthYork Public Library. A few days later, I sent a … Continue reading

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what’s in YOUR collection?

Toronto. When the PHSC was established back in 1974 the majority of members were camera (and lens) collectors. While many collectors had an eclectic taste, others collected by maker (eg. Leica, Zeiss, Ernemann, Kodak, etc.), or by date or price … Continue reading

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the time has come, the walrus said …

Toronto. When photography first burst forth in 1839, lenses were made by opticians and cameras by them or others. As time progressed, optical houses began to make both cameras and lenses. Some like Zeiss also made lenses for others. By … Continue reading

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be positive

Toronto. Did you ever wonder how negatives were converted to positive images – where white was white and black was black? The key was to process the negative, then bleach the film rather than fix it (removes only the developed … Continue reading

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