Tag Archives: Leica

ghosties and ghoulies …

Toronto. … and things that go bump in the night. An old saying to scare children silly in the days before electrical lighting. In the 19th century, few people understood exactly how photography worked. These folk often fell victim to … Continue reading

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Rokkin’ lenses

Toronto. By 1963, the Japanese Optical industry was a tsunami roaring across the Western world. No longer viewed as copy cats of German technology, Japan was rightfully recognized as a serious contender for high quality optical products. A December 6, … Continue reading

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a Canadian icon dies at 90

Toronto. I received an email Friday from George Dunbar. He happened to browse a copy of the Globe on Thursday. George writes in part, “Did you see the huge (two-page) obit for photographer Ted Grant in Thursday’s Globe & Mail? … Continue reading

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pus ça change

Toronto. It is said that the more things change, the more they are the same. Like the Zeiss Sonnar lens for example. Larry Gubas in his massive text “Zeiss and Photography” shows the Sonnar as it was initially sold in … Continue reading

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a Leica to be remembered

Toronto. My good friend and PHSC member, Celio Barreto, sent along this February 21st article from Kosmo Foto, “The WW2 Leica buried by a German soldier’s widow” The Leica in question is a rare 1932 Standard model. In prior years, … Continue reading

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Swiss knives and cameras

Toronto. When the minicam bug took off in the mid 1930s, people traded size for resolution. Companies like Leitz touted the use of enlargers to make large images from the small negatives. And minicams proliferated. The cameras ranged from complex … Continue reading

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Mack the Knife

Toronto. In the days of film, there was colour, colour negative, or black and white films of various speeds and contrast curves. You could buy rolls of 20 (later 24 and 27) or 36 exposure. The more frames, the cheaper … Continue reading

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Henri Cartier-Bresson

Toronto. When I think of Cartier-Bresson, two things come to mind: His Leica and his photograph “Decisive Moment” showing a man leaping over puddles as he runs to work. You can hear Henri discuss this and other well known photographs … Continue reading

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let’s see what develops

Toronto, Ahaaa! Those were the days! You guarded your paltry few shots as if your life depended on them. Why take a dozen and choose the best one when with care and framing you could take and use a single … Continue reading

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silhouette

Toronto. This famous photographer was born in Germany and emigrated to the USA in 1935, prior to the second war to join LIFE magazine. He had already made a name in Europe before moving with his family to America. His … Continue reading

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