Tag Archives: Kodak

to dye for

Toronto. By mid last century we had Kodachrome and its competition to give colour transparencies. They or the original subject could be photographed on three monochrome negatives through colour filters to give one negative per colour band. All three with … Continue reading

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les films noir et blanc

Toronto. When Englishman Dick Maddox announced the dry plate in 1870, he set a course for the future of photography. The invention and expansion of celluloid materials set the stage for emulsion substrates lighter than glass. Around 1886 roll film … Continue reading

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four, square, and fake?

Toronto. With the ever challenging push for market share, Kodak slayed inept film changing with its Kodapak 126 for Instamatics and the flash bulb fumble with a four pack of mini flash bulbs in its flashcube that goes off and … Continue reading

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good money after bad

Toronto. This is what we said when someone spent added money on a lost cause. Sometimes a better way didn’t gain traction in the marketplace and fell in the dustbin of history. This happened to Agfa-Gevaert’s rapid film system. When … Continue reading

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its the dye, silly

Toronto. In the days of colour film, it was somewhat common knowledge that colour photos faded badly and didn’t last. 60 years ago it was appropriate to get a mix of colour and B&W prints to commemorate special occasions like … Continue reading

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more than one way …

Toronto. … to skin a cat, as the old saying goes. Film was no different. Kodak touted its 126 film size (35mm sans traditional sprocket holes and paper backed)┬áKodapak for its instamatic cameras eliminating the “klutzy” confusion of loading and … Continue reading

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idiot proofing film loading

Toronto. The giant Kodak corporation of mid last century dictated film sizes and packaging. One of their extensive studies showed that amateurs had a difficult time changing film. To simplify this task, Kodak invented the instamatic film pack. This 126 … Continue reading

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so’s yer mudder

Toronto. When I was a kid, one of the insults we hurled at each other was “your mudder’s so ugly she wears army boots”. And the rebuttal was, “so’s yer old mudder”. Well in my opinion, the 1965 Kodak Instamatic … Continue reading

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as time goes by

Toronto. The first T in the TNT film processing method ┬ástands for Time. Using a darkroom tank or a daylight tank, it was necessary to use this method of processing a film. Many companies offered a decent timer. This one … Continue reading

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things go better …

Toronto. … with Coke, or so they say. In 1964 Coke used a B&W copy of this advertisement to inform the general public that both Coke and Coca-Cola are the trademarks of the same big company. A camera signified just … Continue reading

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